T4T Extending Work with Coins – Counting Coins

Here is a sample from this resource.  Click the attachment to download the fully-formatted lesson and support materials. Extending Work with Coins:                         Counting Sets of Coins

This lesson is an extension of NC.1.MD.5 to provide cogency to students who need it. In this example, students use patterns to count sets of like coins ( pennies, nickels, and dimes ). Students will connect counting patterns to counting coins and will use coins in different ways to represent the same values. Students will besides explain their strategies for counting sets of pennies, nickels, and dimes .

NC Mathematics Standard: Build understanding of time and money. NC.1.MD.5 Identify quarters, dimes, and nickels and relate their values to pennies. Additional/Supporting Standards: Extend and recognize patterns in the counting sequence. NC.1.NBT.1 Count to 150, starting at any number less than 150. NC.1.NBT.7 Read and write numerals, and represent a number of objects with a written numeral, to 100. Understand place value. NC.1.NBT.2 Understand that the two digits of a two-digit number represent amounts of tens and ones. ● Unitize by making a ten from a collection of ten ones. ● Model the numbers from 11 to 19 as composed of a ten-spot and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones. ● Demonstrate that the numbers 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 refer to one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine tens, with 0 ones. Standards for Mathematical Practice: 

  1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

  2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively.

  1. Model with mathematics.

  1. Use appropriate tools strategically.

  2. Attend to precision.

  3. Look for and make use of structure.

Student Outcomes:

  • I can connect counting patterns to counting sets of pennies, nickels, or dimes and tell how much money each set of coins equals. 

  • I can use coins in different ways to represent the same values. 

Math Language: money : Characteristics, Coin, Dime, Nickel, Penny, Cents, Cent Symbol identify Value : equal To, The Same Amount As, Equivalent, Value, Multiples of 10 count : Patterns, Skip Counting Materials:

  • A visual reference such as an anchor chart (possibly from the previous money lesson, Identifying Coins) with a picture of each coin and the characteristics and values of each coin

  • A bag of coins for each student containing the following : 30 pennies, 10 dimes, and 20 nickels OR images of the coins if money manipulatives are not available
  • A five frame to go with the nickel and another to go with 5 pennies when “Counting Nickels”

  • Copies of hundred charts and a crayon for each student

  • Image of a piggy bank (included in lesson)

Advance Preparation :

  • Prepare and display anchor charts

  • Gather, print, and copy materials as listed above

Directions: To activate prior cognition, teachers may show the video, “ The Coin Song ” ( 2:23 ). hypertext transfer protocol : //www.youtube.com/watch ? v=-SGDAMKtHTE

  1. Guess and Count Around

    (7 minutes) 

The students will practice counting patterns that will help them count sets of alike coins. The teacher will call students to the floor to sit in a circle. The teacher will designate one student to begin counting by ones .

  • Who do you think will say the number 100?  Why?

then students will count around the traffic circle by ones and check their guesses .

  • What pattern(s) did you notice as we counted by ones? 

The teacher will designate a different scholar to begin counting by tens .

  • Who do you think will say the number 100?  Why?

then students will count around the circle by tens and check their guesses .

  • What pattern(s) did you notice as we counted by tens? 

The teacher will designate a different scholar to begin counting by fives .

  • Who do you think will say the number 100?  Why?

then students will count around the circle by fives and check their guesses .

  • What pattern(s) did you notice as we counted by fives? 

  1. Sorting and Counting Pennies (10 minutes)

The teacher will provide each scholar with a udder of coins ( 30 pennies, 10 dimes, and 20 nickels ). The teacher will ask the students to promptly sort their coins into sets of like coins and pull the pennies closest to them. Questions that could be asked :

  • What is a penny worth? 

  • What would we count pennies by?  Why?

  • How could we use a counting pattern to count the value of our pennies?

then the teacher will ask the students to count by ones loudly as they touch and slide each penny from one side. The teacher will record the total on the board. wonder that could be asked :

  • What other coins have the same value as 30 pennies?

  1. Counting Dimes (8 minutes)

The teacher will ask the students to cursorily push their set of pennies aside and pull the dimes closest to them. Questions that could be asked :

  • What is a dime worth? 

  • How many pennies does it take to equal the value of a dime? 

  • What would we count dimes by?  Why?

  • How could we use a counting pattern to count the value of our dimes?

then the teacher will ask the students to count by tens aloud as they touch and slide each dime bag. The teacher will record the sum on the dining table. The teacher will then ask students to show 3 dimes. Questions that could be asked :

  • What is the value of 3 dimes?

  • How could we use a counting pattern to count the value of 3 dimes?

  • How would you tell a friend to find the value of 3 dimes?

* Repeat with 5 dimes, 8 dimes and 9 dimes .

  1.  Counting Nickels (15 minutes)

The teacher will ask the students to quickly push their set of dimes away and pull the nickels closest to them. Questions that could be asked :

  • What is a nickel worth? 

  • How many pennies does it take to equal the value of a nickel? 

  • What would we count nickels by?  Why?

  • How could we use a counting pattern to count the value of our pennies?

The teacher will show the students a nickel and five pennies. The teacher will show a five frame to go with the nickel and another to go with the 5 pennies. Questions that could be asked :

  • Why can we use a five frame to show both a nickel and five pennies? (They both have a value of 5)

  • How could using five frames help us count nickels? (They are both worth 5, so we can skip count by 5s)

The teacher will then ask students to slide 2 nickels in front of them. Questions that could be asked :

  • How could we represent the value of 2 nickels with five frames? (Either 2 five frames full of pennies OR two five frames with a nickel on each)

The student will count by fives touching a five frame for each nickel. The teacher will then ask students to slide 4 nickels in front of them. Questions that could be asked :

  • How could we represent the value of 4 nickels with five frames? (Either 4 five frames full of pennies OR 4 five frames with a nickel on each)

  • How did you count your five frames?

  1. What’s in Your Piggy Bank?  (20 minutes)

The teacher will show a painting of a hoggish bank and pose the surveil situation : My friend told me she had 20 cents in her piggy bank.  She said that all her coins were the same.  I wonder what coins she had in her piggy bank.  The teacher will provide the students with some exploration time to manipulate their coins and specify which coin sets she could have had in her hoggish bank. Five frames are besides available for support as needed. The teacher should look for students who are using different coins and may ask questions such as :

  • Which coins did you choose to use?  How did you count those?

  • How do your coins show 20 cents? 

  • Is there a different way you could represent 20 cents?

When it ’ south time to share, the teacher may ask if anyone represented the 20 cents with only pennies. She may let a student model while partners discuss questions such as :

  • What if her coins were all pennies?

  • What would she have had in her piggy bank?  How do you know?

  •  How could we show her pennies in a picture?  The teacher could model this on the board or inside the piggy bank by drawing a circle for each coin with the value written in the center.

The teacher may ask if anyone represented the 20 cents with only dimes. She may let a student model while partners discuss questions such as :

  • What if her coins were all dimes?

  • How many dimes make 20 cents?

  • What would she have had in her piggy bank?  How do you know?

  • How could you prove you are right?

  • How could we show her dimes in a picture?  The teacher could model this on the board or inside the piggy bank by drawing a circle for each coin with the value written in the center.    

The teacher may ask if anyone represented the 20 cents with lone nickels. She may let a scholar model while partners discuss questions such as :

  • What would her coins look like if all were nickels? 

  • What do you think 20 cents would look like with all nickels? 

  • How could you prove you are right?

  • How could we show her nickels in a picture?  The teacher could model this on the board or inside the piggy bank by drawing each coin with the value of the coin written in the center.

The teacher will then have the students work with a collaborator and use their bag of coins to represent the 30 cents using a sic of comparable coins and draw their representation on composition. Students can represent coins by drawing a circle for each mint with the value written in the center. Questions that could be asked :

  • How could you use your dimes to show 30 cents?

  • How could you use your nickels to show 30 cents?

  • How could you use your pennies to show 30 cents? 

Evaluation of Student Understanding Informal Evaluation: note students as they exercise counting patterns in a circle. Recognize and make note of whether students can correctly call the following number in sequence when count by ones, fives, and tens. As students are sorting their pocket of coins, evaluate whether they are correctly categorizing each mint, particularly the nickels and dimes. While students are counting their sets of like coins aloud, evaluate to learn if they can slide and skip count coins in sequence. Observe students to determine if they can connect patterns to counting sets of pennies, nickels, or dimes and tell how much money each set of coins equals. When students complete the, What’s in Your Piggy Bank? activity, note whether students use coins in unlike ways to represent the lapp value/amount. Formal Evaluation/Exit Ticket: (5 minutes) provide students with problems to solve while you observe their strategies. 1. Madysen has 5 dimes.  How much money does Madysen have?  Show your thinking.  How could you use nickels to show her amount a different way?  Show your thinking. 2. Caelan has 4 nickels.  How much money does he have?  Show your thinking.  How could you use pennies to show his amount a different way?  Show your thinking.  * Teacher can listen for errors in cut count and identifying the value of the coins being counted. The teacher may provide students with five frames that students can use to keep track of counting patterns. Meeting the Needs of the Range of Learners Intervention: 

  • It may be helpful for students to see a dime attached to a ten frame to connect the coin (dime) to the correct value (10 cents). 

  • Expose and model for students how to practice counting by fives to support students as they count nickels.  The touching of five frames allows students to visualize nickels as they count by fives.  

  • Provide students with a hundred chart and crayon to count by fives and tens to visualize the process and make skip counting by like coins more understandable and more automatic.

  • Students may choose to write down the skip counting sequences instead of saying them verbally to allow them more time to think and be accurate.

  • Students could complete the “ Fruit Splat Games ” synergistic games : Pennies, Nickels, and Dimes. hypertext transfer protocol : //www.sheppardsoftware.com/mathgames/earlymath/Fruit_Shoot_coins.htm

Extension:

  • Ask students to explain and write what patterns they used to determine the amount of money in each coin set: counting by ones, fives, and tens.

  • Provide students with the opportunity to count a set of quarters and/or use quarters to represent amounts in a different way such as 50 cents or $1.00.

  • Some students may be ready to work with counting sets of unlike coins or counting larger amounts. 

  • Students could complete the “ Fruit Splat Games ” synergistic games : Nickels & Pennies, Dimes & Pennies, Nickels & Dimes, or Nickels, Dimes & Pennies. hypertext transfer protocol : //www.sheppardsoftware.com/mathgames/earlymath/Fruit_Shoot_coins.htm

Possible Misconceptions/Suggestions:

Possible Misconceptions Suggestions
Students confuse the silver coins Provide ample prison term for students to examine the features of each coin and verbalize the differences. Use very coins whenever possible so students can clearly see characteristics that may not be visible on formative coins .
Students do not skip count correctly when counting sets of like coins The teacher may provide students with five frames for counting nickels and tens frames for counting dimes. The teacher may provide students with a hundred chart to phonograph record and keep track of counting patterns .

Special Notes: When students count pennies and dimes, it should be easier for them because of their hop count experiences in kindergarten with ones and tens. Depending of the clock of year, students may not yet have experiences counting by fives or exploring patterns related to counting by fives. Students should make reference to skip counting to the value of the mint. Students should use like coins in different ways to represent the same value. Possible Solutions: The strategies students use to count like coins may vary. Help them make connections between the five frames and nickels angstrom well as ten frames and dimes. Provide opportunities for students to explore patterns related to counting by fives into their daily activities and routines. enable students to use a hundred chart to keep traverse of numbers when counting like coins. This will allow them to connect patterns to counting sets of pennies, nickels, or dimes and tell how much money each arrange of coins equals. Adapted from  Hunovice, L., OConnell, S., & SanGiovanni, J. ( 2016 ). Teaching first-grade math. Portsmouth, NH : Heinemann. What’s in your Piggy Bank?

Exit Ticket

Madysen has 5 dimes. How a lot money does Madysen have ? Show your intelligent. How could you use nickels to show her sum a unlike way ? Show your think .
Caelan has 4 nickels. How much money does he have ? Show your think. How could you use pennies to show his sum a different way ? Show your thinking.

source : https://ontopwiki.com
Category : Finance

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